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ARTH 1100 : Art Histories: An Introduction
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This lecture class introduces students to the History of Art as a global and interdisciplinary field. Team-taught by several professors from the department its aim is to familiarize students with the most significant areas, epochs and works of art as well as with methods to study them. The course will be organized around specific themes central to the history of art. The theme for fall 2016 is "World Art and Technology." This theme will examine the intersections of art and technology from antiquity to the present in various geographical areas and illustrate their interdependence with material examples from the art historical archive. Art works include stone and brick architecture; cement; textiles; stone, bronze and plaster sculpture; oil paintings; prints; photography; film and digital art.
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ARTH 1158 : FWS: Life and Death in Ancient Pompeii
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Buried by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE and rediscovered in the mid eighteenth century, Pompeii serves as an ideal model for the study of ancient Roman daily life and death.  The forums, baths, theaters, brothels, inns, taverns, homes, apartments, villas, tombs, inscriptions, graffiti, and gardens provide rich and unparalleled data on ancient life.  The city allows us to study the full spectrum of society-the elite and the poor, women, men, and children, freedman, and slaves.  In this course we will use a number of different archaeological, art historical, and literary approaches to investigate ancient life in Pompeii.  We will examine architectural remains and their decoration, ancient food, plants and animal remains, and analyses of the victims in Pompeii trapped in plaster casts.
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ARTH 1160 : FWS: Dangerous Women
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Upon viewing Carolee Schneemann's Fuses, fellow avant-garde filmmaker Jonas Mekas proclaimed it the film of the year, saying, "It is so gorgeous… so dangerous." While Fuses was censored as pornographic, Schneemann reflects that it's lasting impact as a work of art can be attributed to how it differed from pornography, in visually conveying female pleasure: "There's no objectification or fetishization of the woman." In pushing boundaries of representation, Schneemann and her feminist cohort were considered dangerous, and they are not alone in the history of art. Female artists can be situated among other educated women in their presumptive ability to disrupt the natural (patriarchal) order of things. This course considers: women artists connoted as dangerous, from Frida Kahlo to Kara Walker; how women have been villainized in the visual record, from witches to suffragettes; and the pioneering scholars who uncover and interpret these issues, from Linda Nochlin to Deborah Willis. Ultimately, we will connect danger to power.
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ARTH 2000 : Introduction to Visual Studies
Crosslisted as: AMST 2000, COML 2000, VISST 2000 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will introduce you to the field of Visual Studies.  Visual Studies seeks to define and improve our visual relationship to nature and culture after the modern surge in technology and knowledge.  Our field contains objects, images, and problems that lie beyond the fine art boundaries of Art History and the methodological boundaries of experimental science, yet is grown using seeds from both academic cultures.  If you see yourself as a "visual person" and want to explore your interests within both science and art, then this is the course for you.  You will learn the physical and legal limits of human, animal, and machine vision, how knowledge and power gets into images, how spectacle drives the economy, and savvy techniques of analysis that will help you deliver fresh perspectives to whatever course of study you follow.
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ARTH 2200 : Introduction to Art History: The Classical World in 24 Objects
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2700, CLASS 2700 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Why did the Gorgon turn people into stone? Did Cleopatra really have such a big nose? Did the Romans make wax death masks? Should the British Museum return the Parthenon Marbles to Greece? Come and explore all these questions and more in "An Introduction to the Ancient World in 24 Objects". Each class will focus on a single artefact, showing how it is exemplary of key trends and historical moments in Greek and Roman culture, from the temples of ancient Athens to the necropoleis of Roman Egypt and the rainy outposts of Hadrian's Wall. In addition to the history of Greco-Roman art in antiquity, we will explore the influence of Classical art on later Western culture. While focusing on major monuments from Classical antiquity in class, we will also examine Cornell's collection of plaster casts, ancient objects in the Johnson Museum, and the Greek and Roman collections in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York
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ARTH 2355 : Introduction to Art History: Medieval Art and Culture
Crosslisted as: MEDVL 2355 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Survey lecture course covering the creation, encoding, and reception of Medieval (roughly AD 500-1500) European, Byzantine, and Islamic architecture, ornament, manuscripts, liturgical and luxury objects.  The approach is thematic but chronologically grounded; attention is also given to cultural interaction in the Mediterranean basin.
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ARTH 2400 : Introduction to Art History: Renaissance and Baroque Art
Crosslisted as: VISST 2645 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A survey of European art from 1400-1750, including all arts but emphasizing painting and analysis of the works of such major artists as Jan van Eyck, Botticelli, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Velazquez, Rembrandt, and Vermeer.  We will view the art through their social, religious, and political contexts, the role of patrons in the creative process, and the response of viewers.  Major issues include the function of art in religious devotion, moral, philosophical, and social concerns reflected in visual images, changing notions of both the artist and the individual in society, the roles of male and female, and the theme of love.
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ARTH 2500 : Introduction to the History of Photography
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Provides a lecture survey of the history of photography over a course of two centuries. Starting with its invention in the 1830s, covers the subject topically and chronologically. During the nineteenth century, focus is on technical developments and on the complex relations that situate photography in relation to painting, portraiture, urban life, war, anthropology and ethnology, exploration and travel, and science and industry. Over the course of the twentieth century, photography is enriched by new developments: its use as a modernist and experimental art form, in social documentary and photojournalism, in propaganda, in advertising and fashion. In recent decades, photography has assumed a centrality in the practice of conceptual postmodern art, and is currently undergoing a major transformation in the age of digital media.
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ARTH 2550 : Introduction to Art History: Latin American Art
Crosslisted as: LATA 2050 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course is designed to introduce students to Latin American art from the pre-Columbian period to the present. It will cover the arts of ancient civilizations including the Olmec, Maya, Aztec, Moche, and Inca, as well as the colonial, modern, and contemporary arts of Latin America and the Latino/a diaspora. Major themes include the relationship between art and religion, innovations and transformations in Latin American art across time, art and identity, and indigenous contributions to the visual arts. This course examines the societal relevance of images across Latin American cultures by paying close attention to the historical and political contexts in which they were created. Course readings are drawn from the disciplines of art history, anthropology, and history, along with theoretical perspectives on colonialism, postcolonialism, identity, race, and ethnicity.
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ARTH 2710 : Roman Wall Painting
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2710, CLASS 2710 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Some of our very best evidence for Roman art survives in the form of frescoes in Rome, Ostia and (especially) the area surrounding Pompeii. This course will take you through imperial palaces, rural villas, town houses, shops, baths, tombs, taverns and gardens, examining the visual dynamics and socio-cultural significance of wall-paintings within their original archaeological contexts. The study of frescoes offers an exciting means of tackling important questions relating to Roman social history (issues of class, gender, familial and political structures), while inviting us to explore visual themes such as the relationship between art and nature, the use of myth, the spatial dynamics of domestic decorative schemes and concepts of ornament.
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ARTH 2711 : Archaeology of the Roman world: Italy and the West
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 2711, CLASS 2711 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The Roman period has given us a density of archaeological remains that remains unsurpassed in world history, and these have been studied since the very birth of archaeology. As a result, Roman archaeology allows us to explore questions that historians and archaeologists of other periods often cannot. Within this rich body of archaeological evidence, this course will focus on key themes and material for the Roman period in Italy and the Western provinces (especially Gaul and Britain). Central topics include imperialism, urbanism, economy, and social life. What was the archaeological imprint of conquest? How did goods travel around such a wide geographical expanse? What images did people in Britain have of the emperor? We will investigate particular types of evidence, from public monuments over ceramic amphorae to the road system. And we will explore methodological issues, such as what archaeological evidence can tell us, or how to introduce protagonists other than emperors and armies in our reconstructions of the Roman world. Throughout the course, we will question whether the modern world is a productive and valid parallel for archaeological study of the Roman world.
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ARTH 3010 : Photography and the American Dream
Crosslisted as: AMST 3010, ART 3810, VISST 3010 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Who are 'the poor' in the United States? Who are the largest recipients of federal welfare and entitlement spending? Why is there an unprecedented simultaneous increase in wealth and poverty in the United States at this point in its history? What role does photography play in our understanding and misunderstanding of poverty in 'the greatest country in the world?' In this course we will explore the perceptions of poverty in the United States through three major American newspapers.
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ARTH 3101 : Proseminar: Introduction to Methods
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6101, VISST 3101 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Works of art have always engendered political, social, and cultural meanings. This seminar presents an introduction to the methods used by art historians and the objects and ideas that constitute the historiography of their discipline. If art history was once understood as the study of the development of style in "European art," over the past century its practitioners have attempted to embrace a "global" perspective and to address issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Readings will focus on historically situating methods and the implications of their cross-cultural application. Papers will encourage students to put methods into practice, realizing in the process that subject matter is not an isolated choice to which methods are applied, but something that profoundly affects the approach that the researcher brings to the writing of art history.
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ARTH 3230 : Iconography of Greek Myth
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3130, CLASS 3727 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Myths are traditional tales. Their authority becomes apparent in that they were constantly adapted to changing social, political, cultural, etc. conditions. Although this seems to be a widely accepted definition so far, it is deeply influenced by Greek tradition. Not only is the term mythos (word, tale) Greek, but the ubiquity of Greek gods, heroes, and their deeds in ancient literature and material culture has given myths an importance they might not have had in other cultures. This class will give an overview of the most important Greek myths and mythological figures as depicted in Greek and Roman times. The chronological frame will range from the seventh century bc to the third century ad. We will discuss the iconography of the Olympian gods and their escorts; of myths such as the loves of the gods; the battles between the Olympian Gods and the Giants, between Greeks and Amazons as well as between Lapiths and Centaurs; the Trojan War; the adventures of Odysseus; the heroic deeds of Heracles, Theseus and Perseus among others. By analyzing where and when mythological images were on display it will become clear how myths were adapted to their specific context as well as why certain myths were more often depicted or more popular than others.
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ARTH 3250 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755, MEDVL 3750 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
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ARTH 3419 : Rembrandt's Circle: Global Dutch - Travel and Trade in Africa, the Americas, Asia
Crosslisted as: VISST 3419 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
The variety of visual experience in 17th-century Dutch art is legion: still life, portraiture and self-portraiture, landscape and cityscape, architectural painting and scenes of everyday life, all in paint and print. New scientific technologies and trade routes, a proto-capitalist economy and highly networked society also place their mark on the cultural and artistic production in the Netherlands.
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ARTH 3510 : African Art and Culture
Crosslisted as: ASRC 3501 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARTH 3600 : Contemporary Art: 1960-Present
Crosslisted as: VISST 3600 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course discusses new art practices since the 1960s. Although numerous artistic experiments took place during the first half of the twentieth century, it was with the declining importance of modernist painting and sculpture by the late 1950s that newer modes of artistic practice became established. The course will explore the rise of Fluxus, Minimalism, Conceptualism, Land Art, Video and Performance, Postmodernism, and Postcolonialism. These practices are situated in relation to intellectual and social movements since the 1960s, including counterculture, feminism, race, ecology, institutional critique, and globalization. This course focuses primarily on Western European and North American art, but also incorporates selected global developments.
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ARTH 3650 : History and Theory of Digital Art
Crosslisted as: INFO 3660, VISST 3650 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
In this course students will examine the role of mechanical, electronic and digital technologies in the arts of the late 20th and early 21st centuries with emphasis on Europe and North America. Beginning with kinetic art and the cybernetically inspired work of the late 1960s, we will explore early uses of computer technology, including early synthetic video in the 1970s. An overview of pre-internet telematic experiments will lead to an investigation of net.art. The ongoing development of behavioral art forms including interactive installations, robotics, generative art, artificial life art, responsive environments, bio art and video games will be a central theme. Students will be encouraged critically to evaluate a variety of theoretical discourses concerning modern technologies.
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ARTH 3800 : Introduction to the Arts of China
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3800, ASIAN 3383 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course offers a survey of the art and culture of China, from the Neolithic period to the 20th century. We begin with an inquiry into the meaning of national boundaries and the controversy of the Han Chinese people, which helps us identify the scope of Chinese culture. Pre-dynastic (or prehistoric) Chinese culture is presented through both legends about the origins of the Chinese, and scientifically excavated artifacts. Art of the dynastic and modern periods is presented in light of contemporaneous social, political, geographical, philosophical and religious contexts. Students work directly with objects in the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art.
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ARTH 3820 : Introduction to the Arts of Japan
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 3381 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
As an island nation east of the Asian continent, Japan developed a unique culture that reflects both continental and indigenous characteristics. This course examines pre- and post-contact with continental culture and the process of artistic acculturation and assimilation in successive periods of Japanese art history.
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ARTH 3900 : Bollywood and Beyond: South Asian Cinema
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6900, ASIAN 3339, ASIAN 6669, VISST 3901 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course provides an introduction to selected key themes in cinema and the moving image from South Asia. The course investigates documentary, artistic, and commercial cinemas, focusing on concepts and frameworks for understanding their development and their meaning. These include questions of form and narrative, the place of cinema during social and cultural transformation, and the relationship of the moving image in South Asia to developments in global cinema. Structured as a tutorial, this is a reading and discussion intensive course with limited enrolment.
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ARTH 3901 : Ancient Art in Upstate New York
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6901 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARTH 4153 : Topics in Feminist Media Arts
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6153, FGSS 4153, FGSS 6153, VISST 4153 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Seminar topics rotate each semester.
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ARTH 4155 : Topics in Latin American Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6155, LATA 4155, LATA 6155, VISST 4155, VISST 6155 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Topic for spring 2017: Art and Politics in Latin America: From Revolution to Dissimulation
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ARTH 4171 : 19th Century Art and Culture
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
An examination and analysis of the major trends in art from Neoclassicism and Romanticism through Post Impressionism and the dawn of the twentieth century. Lectures and readings will concentrate on the historical context of great masterpieces by seminal artists. The class will investigate the imagery and theoretical foundation of nineteenth-century European and American art using a selection of appropriate methodological approaches. Major figures to be discussed include David, Copley, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, Cole, Manet, Morisot, Monet, Degas, Cassatt, Sargent, Eakins, Homer, Rodin, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cezanne, and Toulouse-Lautrec. Part of each class will be devoted to discussions of the readings. Two classes will be held in the National Gallery of Art at times and dates to be determined. Exams, a term paper, and class participation will be used for evaluative purposes.
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ARTH 4352 : Medieval Cosmologies: Text, Image, and Music
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6352, CLASS 4753, CLASS 7753, MEDVL 4352, MEDVL 6352, MUSIC 4352, NES 4352, NES 6352, RELST 4352, RELST 6352, STS 4352, STS 6352, VISST 4352 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Cosmology can be understood as the search for order in the universe, for an underlying logic that structures and renders intelligible the raw chaos of sensory experience. In this sense, the production of cosmologies is not only a scientific or theoretical enterprise, but also has direct implications for religion, politics, and social ideology. We will adopt a broad approach to the study of the dominant cosmological models in the medieval Mediterranean (ca. 500-1500 C.E.), considering both their sources (Greco-Roman science, mythology, revealed religion, etc.) and their expressions in literature, art, and music.
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ARTH 4440 : Constructing the Self in the Sixteenth Century
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6440, VISST 4440 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar examines issues of identity and self-fashioning in the 16th century in early modern Europe, especially Italy. The proliferation of courtesy manuals, most famous of them by Castiglione and Giovanni della Casa, instructed in "civility," and reflected the concern with manners, appearance, and the ideal characteristics of grace and sprezzatura. In a period preoccupied with gender roles, social class distinctions, and political power, and dominated by courts and dynastic states, the boundaries of masculinity were a particular anxiety. The self could be fashioned or constructed in portraits, self-portraits, and autobiographies, as well as through clothing, bearing, gesture, manners, speech, and the display of material goods. The course also considers some of the public and private settings in which the social self was performed, among them banquets and studies. In a time of travel, the internationalism of consumer goods, and a fascination with distinctions in dress throughout the known world, identity was also negotiated between the familiar and the foreign.
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ARTH 4451 : The World on Paper: Early Modern Printmaking (1475-1798)
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6451, VISST 4451 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Printmaking in early modern Europe ushered in a revolution in the production and perception of images, relatively cheap and available to a wide public. What kinds of images emerged, and what purposes did they serve? What did the buying public do with these images on paper? Taught in the Johnson Museum with its extensive collection of prints and co-led by curator of European art Andrew Weislogel and director Stephanie Wiles, the first aim of this seminar is to experience original masterworks by the most prominent printmakers of the period, including Mantegna, Dürer, Goltzius, Rembrandt, and Hogarth. We will consider the techniques and materiality of prints, look at fakes and forgeries, and discuss patterns of publishing and collecting. A second aim is to examine through analysis of weekly readings themes that concerned printmakers and their viewers. Among class topics are religion and allegory, witches and beggars, humor and satire, portraits of people, cities, and landscapes, issues of self-fashioning, invention, and replication, and prints as sites of knowledge about the expanding world.
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ARTH 4514 : Post Colonial Studies and Black Radical Imagination
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6514, ASRC 4514, ASRC 6514 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARTH 4517 : Saving Synagogues: Architecture, Historic Preservation and Communication
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4517, ARKEO 7517, ARTH 6517, JWST 4517, JWST 7517, NES 4517, RELST 4517 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
For almost two thousand years the synagogue has been the focal point of Jewish life and identity. It has been the most prominent of Jewish buildings, for Jews and non-Jews. Thousands of synagogues have been built, but few synagogues are included in the traditional corpus of architectural history. Until recently, there was little systematic information on synagogue history, design and condition. 
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ARTH 4601 : Space, Gender, Body in Early Modern Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6601, FGSS 4601, FGSS 6601, VISST 4601, VISST 6601 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The body is a universal. How we construct our understandings of it is not. In this class we will investigate conceptions and treatment of the early-modern body (1400-1700) mainly in Europe with excursions to China, Japan, Africa. Among our topics will be: classical understanding of the body and gender; cross-cultural practices of medicine and anatomy; aesthetics and the nude; definitions of beauty and the grotesque. Criminal, sinful and saintly bodies; death, the macabre, and  the mortal, divine body of Christ; the ambiguous gender of children; the formation of identity through portraiture; the science of sexuality and art of erotics as well as correspondences among bodies, domestic and public spaces, the macrocosm and microcosm will round out our study. We will work with historical materials with an eye for current practices in bodily identities.
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ARTH 4771 : Indigenous Art, Film, and New Media: Anti-Colonial Strategies
Crosslisted as: AMST 4771, AMST 6771, ANTHR 4771, ANTHR 6771, ARTH 6771, COML 4771, COML 6771 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course examines Indigenous art, new media and film from three distinct interrelated perspectives of aesthetics/theory, technology and history/culture. The relationship between technology and tradition reevaluates established assumptions between representation, power and the gaze. Decolonizing methodologies will establish the translatability of Indigenous oral tradition to visual expression as a form of cultural agency. The use of media as a cultural and political intervention will be discussed through the work of Hopi filmmaker, Victor Masayesva, Inuit filmmaker, Zacharias Kunuk, the Kayapo Media Collective, Aboriginal artist, Tracy Moffat, new media artist; Mohawk, Skawanati, Maori photographer, John Miller and more. The construction, circulation, and reception of Indigenous visual culture will be discussed within a transnational, diasporic and global frame.
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ARTH 4774 : Indigenous Spaces and Materiality
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4774, ANTHR 7774, ARTH 6774 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Materials will be considered as willful agents within artistic processes across key moments in history by tracing the flow of wampum from the east coast, recognizing the shift from shell to glass during the fur trade up to the emergence of digital experimentation. The introduction of multiple modernities structures the shift from art historical framings of form over matter and connoisseurship to viewing materiality as an active process that continues to map larger social processes and transformation. Archives will be sites of investigation across varied Indigenous geographies marking place, space, bodies and land.
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ARTH 4816 : Modern Chinese Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6816, ASIAN 4473, ASIAN 6673 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
China, a cultural giant of East Asia, made a passive entrance into modernity. With the advent of Western and American colonialism and imperialism, coupled with recent successes in westernization by the Japanese, Chinese artists had to redefine their roles as well as their visions. This turmoil bore witness to a vibrant beginning in modern Chinese art. Interactions between the Chinese themselves, and Chinese interactions with foreigners in the major cities of Shanghai and Beijing, fostered new directions in Chinese art and helped shape western visions of Chinese art history. Issues covered include: Chinese debates on western influence--their theoretical foundations and rationales; New visions for the future of Chinese art in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; Pluralistic approaches and arguments on "Chinese identity" in the modern era; Collecting art and the vision of history; The identity of traditional literati painters in the modern era-their roles, artworks, and deeds; Foreigners in China-the formation of major European collections of Chinese art, and the formation of "Chinese art history" in the West.
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ARTH 4818 : Exhibition Seminar
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6818, ASIAN 4433, ASIAN 6610, VISST 4818, VISST 6818 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Public display of art objects and artifacts involves more than just artistic presentations. How is the title selected? What (whose) works are included? How are they displayed? How are they framed in the exhibition space as well as in an exhibition catalogue? These complex issues are integral to exhibition discourse. Students will review past exhibitions and design a new exhibition based on the collection at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum. The final product will be on view to the public and will be accompanied by an exhibition catalogue co-authored by all participants in the seminar. Students will learn how to engage in academic and scholarly inquiry of issues related to exhibition design, and will experience hands-on aspects of museum work related to organizing an exhibition.
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ARTH 4857 : Biodiversity in Art: Unruly Passions in Collecting, Narrating and Creating
Crosslisted as: ARTH 6857, ASIAN 4493, ASIAN 6693, VISST 4859 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Consciousness of the world's diversity has historically been rooted to artistic endeavors and scientific exploration. Collecting, describing, narrating and ultimately creating of human, plant, and animal species is as much at the heart of Biodiversity in Art as it is a method in Art History and Biology. Situated at the intersection of science and aesthetics, this course explores the creative and often symbiotic, shape-shifting encounters between humans, flora and fauna from early Greek and Roman accounts to Asian articulations through time. Students will be encouraged to apply various methodologies in the writing process as they engage these collecting impulses and unruly passions. Classes will be held at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum.
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ARTH 4991 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 4992 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 4998 : Honors Work I
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
A course for senior Art History majors working on honors theses, with selected reading, research projects, etc., under the supervision of a member of the History of Art faculty.
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ARTH 4999 : Honors Work II
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The student under faculty direction prepares a senior thesis.
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ARTH 5991 : Supervised Reading
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 5992 : Supervised Reading
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 5993 : Supervised Study
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 5994 : Supervised Study
Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Individual investigation and discussion of special topics not covered in the regular course offerings, by arrangement with a member of the department.
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ARTH 6000 : Graduate Research Methods in Art History
Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar introduces graduate students to a range of methodologies and approaches to teaching and researching topics in art history and visual studies. Each week, a member of the faculty will present his or her work to the seminar, highlighting unique research approaches, areas of specialty, technological challenges, and professional and pedagogical rewards. Topics include defining a research question; conducting archival research and fieldwork; syllabus design; identifying funding sources; and grant proposal writing. This course is required for all art history Ph.D. students and open to graduate students from other departments. Students are encouraged to use current technologies for presenting their coursework, including the creation of a blog for documenting ongoing research questions related to their teaching and dissertation.
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ARTH 6101 : Proseminar: Introduction to Methods
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3101, VISST 3101 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Works of art have always engendered political, social, and cultural meanings. This seminar presents an introduction to the methods used by art historians and the objects and ideas that constitute the historiography of their discipline. If art history was once understood as the study of the development of style in "European art," over the past century its practitioners have attempted to embrace a "global" perspective and to address issues of class, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, and gender. Readings will focus on historically situating methods and the implications of their cross-cultural application. Papers will encourage students to put methods into practice, realizing in the process that subject matter is not an isolated choice to which methods are applied, but something that profoundly affects the approach that the researcher brings to the writing of art history.
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ARTH 6153 : Topics in Feminist Media Arts
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4153, FGSS 4153, FGSS 6153, VISST 4153 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Seminar topics rotate each semester.
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ARTH 6155 : Topics in Latin American Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4155, LATA 4155, LATA 6155, VISST 4155, VISST 6155 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Topic for spring 2017: Art and Politics in Latin America: From Revolution to Dissimulation
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ARTH 6352 : Medieval Cosmologies: Text, Image, and Music
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4352, CLASS 4753, CLASS 7753, MEDVL 4352, MEDVL 6352, MUSIC 4352, NES 4352, NES 6352, RELST 4352, RELST 6352, STS 4352, STS 6352, VISST 4352 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Cosmology can be understood as the search for order in the universe, for an underlying logic that structures and renders intelligible the raw chaos of sensory experience. In this sense, the production of cosmologies is not only a scientific or theoretical enterprise, but also has direct implications for religion, politics, and social ideology. We will adopt a broad approach to the study of the dominant cosmological models in the medieval Mediterranean (ca. 500-1500 C.E.), considering both their sources (Greco-Roman science, mythology, revealed religion, etc.) and their expressions in literature, art, and music.
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ARTH 6440 : Constructing the Self in the 16th Century
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4440, VISST 4440 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
This seminar examines issues of identity and self-fashioning in the 16th century in early modern Europe, especially Italy. The proliferation of courtesy manuals, most famous of them by Castiglione and Giovanni della Casa, instructed in "civility," and reflected the concern with manners, appearance, and the ideal characteristics of grace and sprezzatura. In a period preoccupied with gender roles, social class distinctions, and political power, and dominated by courts and dynastic states, the boundaries of masculinity were a particular anxiety. The self could be fashioned or constructed in portraits, self-portraits, and autobiographies, as well as through clothing, bearing, gesture, manners, speech, and the display of material goods. The course also considers some of the public and private settings in which the social self was performed, among them banquets and studies. In a time of travel, the internationalism of consumer goods, and a fascination with distinctions in dress throughout the known world, identity was also negotiated between the familiar and the foreign.
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ARTH 6451 : The World on Paper: Early Modern Printmaking (1475-1798)
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4451, VISST 4451 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Printmaking in early modern Europe ushered in a revolution in the production and perception of images, relatively cheap and available to a wide public. What kinds of images emerged, and what purposes did they serve? What did the buying public do with these images on paper? Taught in the Johnson Museum with its extensive collection of prints and co-led by curator of European art Andrew Weislogel and director Stephanie Wiles, the first aim of this seminar is to experience original masterworks by the most prominent printmakers of the period, including Mantegna, Dürer, Goltzius, Rembrandt, and Hogarth. We will consider the techniques and materiality of prints, look at fakes and forgeries, and discuss patterns of publishing and collecting. A second aim is to examine through analysis of weekly readings themes that concerned printmakers and their viewers. Among class topics are religion and allegory, witches and beggars, humor and satire, portraits of people, cities, and landscapes, issues of self-fashioning, invention, and replication, and prints as sites of knowledge about the expanding world.
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ARTH 6514 : Post Colonial Studies and Black Radical Imagination
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4514, ASRC 4514, ASRC 6514 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARTH 6517 : Saving Synagogues: Architecture, Historic Preservation and Communication
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 4517, ARKEO 7517, ARTH 4517, JWST 4517, JWST 7517, NES 4517, RELST 4517 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
For almost two thousand years the synagogue has been the focal point of Jewish life and identity. It has been the most prominent of Jewish buildings, for Jews and non-Jews. Thousands of synagogues have been built, but few synagogues are included in the traditional corpus of architectural history. Until recently, there was little systematic information on synagogue history, design and condition. 
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ARTH 6601 : Space, Gender, Body in Early Modern Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4601, FGSS 4601, FGSS 6601, VISST 4601, VISST 6601 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
The body is a universal. How we construct our understandings of it is not. In this class we will investigate conceptions and treatment of the early-modern body (1400-1700) mainly in Europe with excursions to China, Japan, Africa. Among our topics will be: classical understanding of the body and gender; cross-cultural practices of medicine and anatomy; aesthetics and the nude; definitions of beauty and the grotesque. Criminal, sinful and saintly bodies; death, the macabre, and  the mortal, divine body of Christ; the ambiguous gender of children; the formation of identity through portraiture; the science of sexuality and art of erotics as well as correspondences among bodies, domestic and public spaces, the macrocosm and microcosm will round out our study. We will work with historical materials with an eye for current practices in bodily identities.
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ARTH 6734 : The Ancient Senses
Crosslisted as: CLASS 7734 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course will take advantage of new scholarship on the history of the senses to explore Greek and Roman culture through the perceptual capacities of the body. We will examine ancient theories of embodiment and sense-perception (with a special focus on Aristotle), as well as the ways in which cultural artefacts invited, modeled, examined, or problematized sensory relations between humans and their environments. From the hero's voice in Greek tragedy to the smells of urban Rome, and from visions of the gods to the textural qualities of language, we will take a multi-disciplinary approach. There will be a special focus on sound, in order to prepare students who may wish to take part in the 2017 CorHaLi conference at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Nafplio, Greece, but the course is open to anyone with an interest in historical approaches to the senses. Special guests will visit our seminars, including Shane Butler, Chair of Classics at Johns Hopkins University, author of The Ancient Phonograph and editor of the Routledge series, The Senses in Antiquity.
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ARTH 6771 : Indigenous Art, Film, and New Media: Anti-Colonial Strategies
Crosslisted as: AMST 4771, AMST 6771, ANTHR 4771, ANTHR 6771, ARTH 4771, COML 4771, COML 6771 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course examines Indigenous art, new media and film from three distinct interrelated perspectives of aesthetics/theory, technology and history/culture. The relationship between technology and tradition reevaluates established assumptions between representation, power and the gaze. Decolonizing methodologies will establish the translatability of Indigenous oral tradition to visual expression as a form of cultural agency. The use of media as a cultural and political intervention will be discussed through the work of Hopi filmmaker, Victor Masayesva, Inuit filmmaker, Zacharias Kunuk, the Kayapo Media Collective, Aboriginal artist, Tracy Moffat, new media artist; Mohawk, Skawanati, Maori photographer, John Miller and more. The construction, circulation, and reception of Indigenous visual culture will be discussed within a transnational, diasporic and global frame.
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ARTH 6774 : Indigenous Spaces and Materiality
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4774, ANTHR 7774, ARTH 4774 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Materials will be considered as willful agents within artistic processes across key moments in history by tracing the flow of wampum from the east coast, recognizing the shift from shell to glass during the fur trade up to the emergence of digital experimentation. The introduction of multiple modernities structures the shift from art historical framings of form over matter and connoisseurship to viewing materiality as an active process that continues to map larger social processes and transformation. Archives will be sites of investigation across varied Indigenous geographies marking place, space, bodies and land.
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ARTH 6780 : Persecution and the Art of Writing
Crosslisted as: COML 6661, GERST 6780, GOVT 6785, JWST 6780 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
Our title is derived from the political philosopher Leo Strauss, who provides our initial analytic, methodological, and theoretical model. But we extend it beyond Straussian ideological positions and we include Art unrestricted to Written philosophy and literature, as in painting, music, cinema, and Reason of State. Persecution (via censorship or heterodoxy) is understood as being both externally imposed and internalized. "The double rhetoric" or "esotericism," and hence "writing between the lines," has a millennial history dating back to archaic times in probably all known cultures. We focus on more recent manifestations across disciplines, periods, and places. Examples include Gramsci (Prison Notebooks), Hegel (as read by Left-Hegelians and by Marx), and Lessing (on the Free Masons), but also Nietzsche, Heidegger, Freud, Wittgenstein, and their legacies.
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ARTH 6816 : Modern Chinese Art
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4816, ASIAN 4473, ASIAN 6673 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor:
China, a cultural giant of East Asia, made a passive entrance into modernity. With the advent of Western and American colonialism and imperialism, coupled with recent successes in westernization by the Japanese, Chinese artists had to redefine their roles as well as their visions. This turmoil bore witness to a vibrant beginning in modern Chinese art. Interactions between the Chinese themselves, and Chinese interactions with foreigners in the major cities of Shanghai and Beijing, fostered new directions in Chinese art and helped shape western visions of Chinese art history. Issues covered include: Chinese debates on western influence--their theoretical foundations and rationales; New visions for the future of Chinese art in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; Pluralistic approaches and arguments on "Chinese identity" in the modern era; Collecting art and the vision of history; The identity of traditional literati painters in the modern era-their roles, artworks, and deeds; Foreigners in China-the formation of major European collections of Chinese art, and the formation of "Chinese art history" in the West.
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ARTH 6818 : Exhibition Seminar
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4818, ASIAN 4433, ASIAN 6610, VISST 4818, VISST 6818 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Public display of art objects and artifacts involves more than just artistic presentations. How is the title selected? What (whose) works are included? How are they displayed? How are they framed in the exhibition space as well as in an exhibition catalogue? These complex issues are integral to exhibition discourse. Students will review past exhibitions and design a new exhibition based on the collection at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum. The final product will be on view to the public and will be accompanied by an exhibition catalogue co-authored by all participants in the seminar. Students will learn how to engage in academic and scholarly inquiry of issues related to exhibition design, and will experience hands-on aspects of museum work related to organizing an exhibition.
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ARTH 6857 : Biodiversity in Art: Unruly Passions in Collecting, Narrating and Creating
Crosslisted as: ARTH 4857, ASIAN 4493, ASIAN 6693, VISST 4859 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
Consciousness of the world's diversity has historically been rooted to artistic endeavors and scientific exploration. Collecting, describing, narrating and ultimately creating of human, plant, and animal species is as much at the heart of Biodiversity in Art as it is a method in Art History and Biology. Situated at the intersection of science and aesthetics, this course explores the creative and often symbiotic, shape-shifting encounters between humans, flora and fauna from early Greek and Roman accounts to Asian articulations through time. Students will be encouraged to apply various methodologies in the writing process as they engage these collecting impulses and unruly passions. Classes will be held at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum.
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ARTH 6900 : Bollywood and Beyond: South Asian Cinema
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3900, ASIAN 3339, ASIAN 6669, VISST 3901 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course provides an introduction to selected key themes in cinema and the moving image from South Asia. The course investigates documentary, artistic, and commercial cinemas, focusing on concepts and frameworks for understanding their development and their meaning. These include questions of form and narrative, the place of cinema during social and cultural transformation, and the relationship of the moving image in South Asia to developments in global cinema. Structured as a tutorial, this is a reading and discussion intensive course with limited enrolment.
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ARTH 6901 : Ancient Art in Upstate New York
Crosslisted as: ARTH 3901 Semester offered: Fall 2017 Instructor: Description
ARTH 6910 : Vision in Theory
Crosslisted as: COML 6142, GERST 6910 Semester offered: Spring 2017 Instructor:
This course takes as its point of departure the foundational questions that have informed interdisciplinary inquiry into vision and visuality in recent decades: What is an image? How do images produce meaning? How has vision been defined historically and methodologically? How has visual culture been construed theoretically? Our goal will be to sketch the genealogical trajectories that comprise visual studies as a field of investigation by focusing on concerns that have shaped larger theoretical debates on the politics and ethics of representation, including mimesis, realism, perspective, the interplay of word and image, attention, spectacle, and surveillance. Readings will be drawn from influential works in visual theory, cultural semiotics and anthropology, media studies, and the science of vision. They may include texts by Alpers, Bal, Barthes, Crary, Elkins, Foucault, Haraway, Jay, Livingstone, Merleau-Ponty, Mitchell, Stafford, Panofski, Ranciere, and Virilio, among others.
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